Singular sense (not non-sense)

One of my colleagues turned straight to chapter 9 in the book, the story of Abraham's sacrifice of Isaac, known in Jewish theology as the Akedah ('the binding of Isaac'). Where is the 'sense' in this chapter, a father asked to sacrifice 'your son, your only son, whom you love, Isaac'? Non-sense is the easy answer. Easier yet is Immanuel Kant's solution: God never gave the command, and Abraham should have known that God would never ask such a thing of him. Søren Kierkegaard made this story the cornerstone of his theology (and philosophy) but not because he thought it made sense. I have entitled my chapter "Singular Sense" because that is what I think it is. Singular (dictionary) = extraordinary; remarkable; exceptional; unusual or strange; odd; different; being the only one of its kind; distinctive; unique.

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